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Ohri’s Jiva – Good Service, Ordinary Food

Ohri’s Jiva – Good service, ordinary food
Dinner last night was at Ohri’s Jiva. We were shopping in the city, and were looking for a place we hadn’t been to before, and this was the closest.
After our car was taken away by the valet, we stepped in to find ourselves part of a huge crowd of waiting people. More than fifty people were sitting or standing around, and we were ready to turn around and leave. That was when I noticed a poster advertising a Rs. 199 buffet, and a guy standing at a counter with a huge booking register. I made my way to him and asked him how long it would take us to get in. When he said at least half an hour, we were a bit put off. However, in our hurry, we hadn’t noticed the huge self-service section buzzing with activity. Figuring out we would be better off serving ourselves instead of waiting for the buffet, we got a table and set about ordering.
Vidya asked for a puri-subzi and a plate of button idlis. I couldn’t decide what I wanted, and ordered a plate of chilli vegetable sticks, figuring I could munch on it while I decided what to get. We got the button idlis right away, and while waiting for the other food, ordered a half and half pizza. The idlis were alright – nothing to write home about, but nothing to find fault either. And then came the shock – when I walked up to collect the puris and the vegetable sticks, I found the portions were really huge. The puri-subzi had five puris, a large portion of subzi, pickles and a gulab jamun. The vegetable chilli sticks turned out to be six huge, frankfurter-sized dough and vegetable sticks skewered on long cocktail sticks. This was definitely more substantial than we had anticipated, and we decided to get the pizza to take away.
The food was pretty ordinary, but not bad by any standards. What was more striking about the experience was the speed and efficiency of service, and how the staff was able to manage the crowd. There were about a hundred seats, and most of them were full all the time. There was a constant turnover, and there was also a takeaway counter. All this was being managed without any hiccups by smart and efficient manning of the cash and delivery counters. Defeinitely a place I would recommend for a quick bite if you don’t care too much about the taste.
Ohri’s Jiva was a good dining experience, in spite of the ordinary food.
Address: 5-9-30/16-20, Vista Grand Towers, Raj Bhavan Road, Somajiguda, Hyderabad
Phone: 9866778005, 9866778047

Dinner last night was at Ohri’s Jiva. We were shopping in the city, and were looking for a place we hadn’t been to before, and this was the closest.

After our car was taken away by the valet, we stepped in to find ourselves part of a huge crowd of waiting people. More than fifty people were sitting or standing around, and we were ready to turn around and leave. That was when I noticed a poster advertising a Rs. 199 buffet, and a guy standing at a counter with a huge booking register. I made my way to him and asked him how long it would take us to get in. When he said at least half an hour, we were a bit put off. However, in our hurry, we hadn’t noticed the huge self-service section buzzing with activity. Figuring out we would be better off serving ourselves instead of waiting for the buffet, we got a table and set about ordering.

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Keeping it Cool on the Street!

[A good, strong Hyderabadi stomach is recommended before trying any of the street-side coolers mentioned here]

Hyderabadi summers have to be experienced to be believed. Stepping out is like stepping into a sauna. If you stand out for more than a few minutes at a time, your skin is liable to slowly peel off, and you will quickly melt into a pool of unspeakability, which will evaporate before anyone can say ‘unspeakability’. I kid you not.

However, brave soul that I am, I ventured out into this terrible heat on more than a few occasions, and have lived to tell the tale. The secret to survival in this heat is to keep yourself hydrated at all times. And to help you do that, there are numerous roadside vendors peddling you many types of coolers. Here are a few of my encounters with these purveyors of the finest coolants money can buy on the streets of Hyderabad.

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Meals Carner, Kondapur – Food for Thought

Sometimes, just sometimes, you come across things that boggle the mind and leave such an impression on you that you just have to write stuff about them. Meals Carner is such a place.

Driving down the road from Kondapur to our home in the not-so-sleepy hamlet of Hafeezpet, Vidya and I noticed the new brightly-lit sign that proclaimed the arrival of Meals Carner. After about a week since Vidya noticed and remarked on the place, I had occasion to go there to buy some food, and this is what I encountered.

Meals Carner, regardless of the fancy name, was a bit of a dingy place with white-painted walls, the obligatory fan that would rather sprinkle dust than stir even the slightest of breezes (should it ever be switched on, which thankfully it never seem to have been, going by the massive arachnid civilization that seemed to be flourishing in and around it) and the increasingly popular compact fluorescent lights that seem to leave the insects confused as to whether they were coming or going. What made a screaming difference between Meals Carner and its brethren (Popular names include Sai Prasad Mess, King Star Bakery and Meals, Cafe Abba Beel) were the posters that adorned the walls.

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Pancakes!

After our Hampi trip, where we gorged on pancakes whenever the whim took us, Vidya has been hankering for them. We bought the flour a couple of weeks ago, and things have been so crazy we didn’t have the time to make them.

Tonight, Vidya wanted to have them for dinner, and I rose to the challenge.

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Waiting for food

Posted by mobile phone:
Here I am, once again waiting for my takeaway order at Punjabi Rasoi in Gachibowli. This time it’s a couple of gobi mutter stuffed parathas, a couple of masala kulchas, a paneer pudina tikka and an aloo methi. This has almost become a weekly ritual played out every friday evening. These guys make tasty food at reasonable prices – an average meal for two would be roughly 200 to 250 rupees.

The ambience is typical city dhaba with waiters who speak English, large LCD televisions showing cricket or Bollywood songs and a north Indian and Chinese menu. The experience is as much a hotch potch as the previous sentence is. read more

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